Conservation Attitudes And Patterns Of Biodiversity Loss In The Ohangwena And Oshikoto Regions Of Namibia

Abstract

Biodiversity loss discussions are usually characterised by broad ranging views. Patterns of wildlife decline and attitudes towards conservation have received minimal attention in the north central communal areas of Namibia. Wildlife decline has been primarily attributed to life styles, climatic change and the disruption to conservation activities during the war for independence (1966 – 1989). This thesis examines attitudes towards wildlife and conservation, and patterns of biodiversity loss in areas of low and high human densities in the north central communal areas of Namibia, between July 2003 and May 2004. The stratified sampling method was used to investigate attitudes and biodiversity loss within the Eengodi, Epembe, Ongenga and Omuntele constituencies, where 119 households were interviewed. Results indicate that predators are perceived as vermin, with over two-thirds of interviewed households not wanting predators on farmlands. Communities located closest to parks had a higher incidence of negative attitudes towards wildlife, probably due to incursions by conflict animals from the park. Non-consumptive values of wildlife ranked highest on the list of primary benefits of having game animals on farmlands. The study shows a persistent decrease in biodiversity for surveyed constituencies. Large mammals were impacted first, with an 88% decline in sightings over the past three decades. Respondents reported 21 species present in the region; however, areas settled for more than 40 years reported no large mammals. Respondents reported a lack of coordination in conservation efforts; of 89 households practicing wildlife conservation, only 20% coordinated these practices with other community members. Respondents felt that wildlife could be conserved if every individual accepted the responsibility for protecting it. Given the lack of coordination and structure of conservation efforts in the region, the implementation of some form of structure, which promotes community-based natural resource management, such as establishing communal conservancies, could reverse the decline in wildlife.

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APA

Henghali, J (2021). Conservation Attitudes And Patterns Of Biodiversity Loss In The Ohangwena And Oshikoto Regions Of Namibia. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/conservation-attitudes-and-patterns-of-biodiversity-loss-in-the-ohangwena-and-oshikoto-regions-of-namibia

MLA 8th

Henghali, Josephine "Conservation Attitudes And Patterns Of Biodiversity Loss In The Ohangwena And Oshikoto Regions Of Namibia" Afribary. Afribary, 28 Apr. 2021, https://afribary.com/works/conservation-attitudes-and-patterns-of-biodiversity-loss-in-the-ohangwena-and-oshikoto-regions-of-namibia. Accessed 20 Jun. 2024.

MLA7

Henghali, Josephine . "Conservation Attitudes And Patterns Of Biodiversity Loss In The Ohangwena And Oshikoto Regions Of Namibia". Afribary, Afribary, 28 Apr. 2021. Web. 20 Jun. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/conservation-attitudes-and-patterns-of-biodiversity-loss-in-the-ohangwena-and-oshikoto-regions-of-namibia >.

Chicago

Henghali, Josephine . "Conservation Attitudes And Patterns Of Biodiversity Loss In The Ohangwena And Oshikoto Regions Of Namibia" Afribary (2021). Accessed June 20, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/conservation-attitudes-and-patterns-of-biodiversity-loss-in-the-ohangwena-and-oshikoto-regions-of-namibia