Edible Insect as A Traditional Food Source Among the Akans in Southern Ghana.

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ABSTRACT

The African palm weevil, Rhynchophorous phoenicis larva is a popular delicacy among the Akans of Ghana and consumption of this insect is an important tradition in the Birim South, East Akim and Kwahu West districts all in Southern Ghana. Closed and open ended questionnaires were administered in these districts to investigate the main edible insects eaten and their perception about entomophagy. The African palm weevil was the main insect named by this group and out of a total of 500 respondents interviewed in this survey, 92.4% (462) actively consumed R. phoenicis. 8.3% (42) indicated that entomophagy was primitive. 1.2% (6) of the respondents interviewed consumed the pupae whilst 11.3% (57) consumed the adult. 87.5% (437) preferred to feed on the larvae (grub). 54.1% (270) of the respondents regularly consumed the larvae as part of their diet, 10.5% (53) of respondents consumed it because of its flavor and 7.6% (38) consumed it out of curiosity. 27.8% (139) indicated that the larvae were very nutritious. Laboratory experiment was also carried out to evaluate suitable substrates and appropriate temperatures for rearing Rhynchophorous phoenicis. Three substrates, palm heart, raphia palm and sugarcane slices were soaked for a period of three days to soften it. Three pairs of unmated adult weevils were sexed based on a series of black hair at the tail end of the snout and placed on each substrate for mating. The insects were reared at different temperatures, 24 ± 2°C, 70 ± 5; 20 ± 2°C, 70 ± 5 and 28 ± 2°C, 70 ± 5. After mating, females were transferred into oviposition bowls filled with each substrate. Eggs laid were counted under microscope and transferred into their respective substrates for observation. Parameters like, female fecundity, percentage hatchability, larval period, pupation period, successful adult emergence and longevity span of R. phoenicis were observed. Higher amount of eggs laid (122.60 ± 7.4) and percentage hatchability of 95.5% were recorded on palm heart compared to the other substrates at 24 ± 2°C, http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/ iv 70 ± 5 R.H with larval period and longevity of R. phoenicis being shortest. Sugarcane slices were the most suitable substrate for pupation with the highest adult emergence of 18.20 ± 0.5 at 20 ± 2°C, 70 ± 5 R.H. However, the life cycle of R. phoenicis was shorter at 24 ± 2°C, 70 ± 5 R.H on palm heart. Sensory analyses of R. phoenicis with other meat samples were done and 10 panelists were trained to evaluate the samples. After the training, panelists agreed on some meat characteristics and were scored on a scale of five. Significant differences (P > 0.05) occurred in the acceptability of the samples with panelists showing more preference for R. phoenicis.

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APA

Frontiers, E. & DEBRAH, S (2022). Edible Insect as A Traditional Food Source Among the Akans in Southern Ghana.. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/edible-insect-as-a-traditional-food-source-among-the-akans-in-southern-ghana

MLA 8th

Frontiers, Edu, and SHADRACK DEBRAH "Edible Insect as A Traditional Food Source Among the Akans in Southern Ghana." Afribary. Afribary, 19 Jun. 2022, https://afribary.com/works/edible-insect-as-a-traditional-food-source-among-the-akans-in-southern-ghana. Accessed 03 Jul. 2022.

MLA7

Frontiers, Edu, and SHADRACK DEBRAH . "Edible Insect as A Traditional Food Source Among the Akans in Southern Ghana.". Afribary, Afribary, 19 Jun. 2022. Web. 03 Jul. 2022. < https://afribary.com/works/edible-insect-as-a-traditional-food-source-among-the-akans-in-southern-ghana >.

Chicago

Frontiers, Edu and DEBRAH, SHADRACK . "Edible Insect as A Traditional Food Source Among the Akans in Southern Ghana." Afribary (2022). Accessed July 03, 2022. https://afribary.com/works/edible-insect-as-a-traditional-food-source-among-the-akans-in-southern-ghana