Influence of storage structure on tomato perishability

CHAPTER ONE

1.0  Introduction

1.1  Justification

1.2   1.2 Objectives of study

CHAPTER TWO

2.0 LITERATURE REVIEW

2.1 Brief history of tomato cultivation

2.2 Botanical classification

2.3 Description

2.4 Varieties of tomato

2.5 TOMATO VARIETIES AND THEIR CHOICE OF USES

2.6 Fruit characteristics

2.7 Fruit colour

2.8 Fruit Texture

2.9 Postharvest Handling Practices for Tomatoes

2.10 Postharvest Treatment Techniques for Tomatoes

2.11 Postharvest Heat Treatment of Tomatoes

2.12 Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP)

2.13 Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) Application

2.14 Postharvest pest and disease

2.15 Physiological disorders of tomato fruits

2.16 Control of postharvest diseases and losses of tomato fruits

2.17 Nutritional values in tomatoes

2.19 Principle of evaporative cooling

CHAPTER THREE

3.0 MATERIALS AND METHOD

3.1 Experimental site

3.2 Source of experimental sample

3.3 Experimental procedure

3.4 Storage experiment

3.5 Experimental design

3.6 Experimental observation

3.6.1 Physical parameters

3.6.2 Chemical parameter

CHAPTER FOUR

4.0 RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS

4.1 Physical parameters

4.1.1 Temperature readings during the period of storage

4.1.2 Weight loss

4.1.3 Freshness

4.1.4 Firmness

4.1.5 Decay

4.1.6 Colour change

4.2 Chemical parameter

4.2.1 Nutritional composition of Tomato fruits

4.2.2 Effect of storage technique on nutritional composition of tomato fruits (hybrid

tomato)

CHAPTER FIVE

5.0 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

APPENDIX

REFERENCE

ABSTRACT

Globally the fight against hunger to improve food security in developing countries such as Nigeria should be prioritized especially in the area of crop losses (FAO, 2010). An estimated one-third of food produced for consumption is lost globally, consequently meaning that about 1.3 billion tonnes worth of food is lost per year (FAO 2011). The adverse effects of crop losses include a reduction in quantity and quality, environmental pollution, and reduced economic development. When narrowed down means a reduction in farmers‟ income, and a reduction in food security for consumers. Nigeria ranks highest in Africa in terms of tomato production, 879,000 t/annum (Grubben and Denton, 2004). Tomato accounts for about 18% of the average daily consumption of vegetables in Nigeria (Olayide et al, 1972), and may be pressed into pastes which are used for cooking and in the production of fruit drinks (Babalola, et al, 2010). The quality and nutritional value of freshly produced tomato fruits are affected by pre- and postharvest factors, improper handling, and other conditions (Kader, 1986). This huge loss has prompted the search for simple, effective and economical methods to control pre- and postharvest diseases and other losses in tomatoes (Wilson and Wisniewski, 1989).

To understand alternative storage structures that can be used for tomato fruit storage, the effect of three storage techniques namely: Refrigerator (13o c), Evaporative coolant structure – pot in pot (ECS 21.3o c), and Open shelf (Control 26.7o c) which were completely randomized design with three replicates were investigated. The physical parameters evaluated before and after storage include weight loss, Firmness, Freshness, color change, and Decay. The Chemical parameter (pH, Vitamin C, P, Ca, Mg, k, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, lycopene, Moisture content, Dry matter) were also investigated.

The refrigerator ranked best among the three-storage structure used in terms of the quality of tomato fruits. It is therefore recommended to be used anywhere for effective storage provided there is a constant power supply. The open shelf structure had a better physical quality in terms of weight loss, firmness, freshness, and decay compared to ECS, but lower than the Refrigerator. For chemical parameters, the Open shelf gave the highest iron, potassium, phosphorus, and Vitamin C content, it can therefore be a better storage technique for long-term storage periods provided the tomatoes are properly washed and handled from harvest to storage and are kept from direct sunlight with adequate ventilation.

The ECS had a rapid color change from green to red in nine days while maintaining the firmness, and freshness of the fruits. Therefore, the ECS could be recommended for a fast change of colour of tomato to meet up with the demand for the market, especially for places where there is high demand for fresh red tomatoes.

Further research should be carried out to improve the efficiency of the Evaporative coolant structure and open shelf structure as an alternative storage technique to refrigerators, especially in the area of ventilation for the ECS to reduce respiration rate.

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APA

Taiwo Oluwaseun, O. (2023). Influence of storage structure on tomato perishability. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/influence-of-storage-structure-on-tomato-perishability

MLA 8th

Taiwo Oluwaseun, Opadotun "Influence of storage structure on tomato perishability" Afribary. Afribary, 05 Oct. 2023, https://afribary.com/works/influence-of-storage-structure-on-tomato-perishability. Accessed 13 Jul. 2024.

MLA7

Taiwo Oluwaseun, Opadotun . "Influence of storage structure on tomato perishability". Afribary, Afribary, 05 Oct. 2023. Web. 13 Jul. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/influence-of-storage-structure-on-tomato-perishability >.

Chicago

Taiwo Oluwaseun, Opadotun . "Influence of storage structure on tomato perishability" Afribary (2023). Accessed July 13, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/influence-of-storage-structure-on-tomato-perishability

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