Chemo-Ecological Insights into the Use of the Non-Host Plant Vegetable Black-Jack to Protect Two Susceptible Solanaceous Crops from Root-Knot Nematode Parasitism

Abstract:

Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) develop through three major stages in their life cycle: hatching, infection, and reproduction. Interruption of any of these stages can affect their growth and survival. We used screenhouse pot experiments, laboratory in vitro hatching and mortality assays, and chemical analysis to test the hypothesis that the non-host Asteraceae plant vegetable black-jack (Bidens pilosa) suppresses infection of the PPN Meloidogyne incognita in two susceptible Solanaceae host plants, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and black nightshade (S. nigrum). In intercrop and drip pot experiments, B. pilosa significantly reduced the number of galls and egg masses in root-knot nematode (RKN)-susceptible host plants by 3–9-fold compared to controls. Chemical analysis of the most bioactive fraction from the root exudates of B. pilosa identified several classes of compounds, including vitamins, a dicarboxylic acid, amino acids, aromatic acids, and a flavonoid. In in vitro assays, the vitamins and aromatic acids elicited the highest inhibition in egg hatching, whereas ascorbic acid (vitamin) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (aromatic acid) elicited strong nematicidal activity against M. incognita, with LC50/48 h values of 12 and 300 ng/μL, respectively. Our results provide insights into how certain non-host plants can be used as companion crops to disrupt PPN infestation.
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APA

Kihika-Opanda, R , Kihika-Opanda, R , Kihika-Opanda, R & Kihika-Opanda, R (2024). Chemo-Ecological Insights into the Use of the Non-Host Plant Vegetable Black-Jack to Protect Two Susceptible Solanaceous Crops from Root-Knot Nematode Parasitism. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/chemo-ecological-insights-into-the-use-of-the-non-host-plant-vegetable-black-jack-to-protect-two-susceptible-solanaceous-crops-from-root-knot-nematode-parasitism

MLA 8th

Kihika-Opanda, Ruth et. al. "Chemo-Ecological Insights into the Use of the Non-Host Plant Vegetable Black-Jack to Protect Two Susceptible Solanaceous Crops from Root-Knot Nematode Parasitism" Afribary. Afribary, 10 Mar. 2024, https://afribary.com/works/chemo-ecological-insights-into-the-use-of-the-non-host-plant-vegetable-black-jack-to-protect-two-susceptible-solanaceous-crops-from-root-knot-nematode-parasitism. Accessed 30 May. 2024.

MLA7

Kihika-Opanda, Ruth, Ruth Kihika-Opanda , Ruth Kihika-Opanda and Ruth Kihika-Opanda . "Chemo-Ecological Insights into the Use of the Non-Host Plant Vegetable Black-Jack to Protect Two Susceptible Solanaceous Crops from Root-Knot Nematode Parasitism". Afribary, Afribary, 10 Mar. 2024. Web. 30 May. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/chemo-ecological-insights-into-the-use-of-the-non-host-plant-vegetable-black-jack-to-protect-two-susceptible-solanaceous-crops-from-root-knot-nematode-parasitism >.

Chicago

Kihika-Opanda, Ruth , Kihika-Opanda, Ruth , Kihika-Opanda, Ruth and Kihika-Opanda, Ruth . "Chemo-Ecological Insights into the Use of the Non-Host Plant Vegetable Black-Jack to Protect Two Susceptible Solanaceous Crops from Root-Knot Nematode Parasitism" Afribary (2024). Accessed May 30, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/chemo-ecological-insights-into-the-use-of-the-non-host-plant-vegetable-black-jack-to-protect-two-susceptible-solanaceous-crops-from-root-knot-nematode-parasitism