Clinical Malaria Reduces Human Attractiveness to Mosquitoes

Abstract:

Evolutionary fitness concepts dictate that blood parasites should regulate their transmission success by enhancing the responsiveness of arthropod vectors to infectious hosts. We observed that the presence of trophozoite stages of Plasmodium falciparum in peripheral blood, combined with clinical malaria symptoms, actually reduced the attractiveness to Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes of one Kenyan male, relative to another. Their innate levels of attractiveness were restored within days, prior to the onset of gametocytaemia. These findings support the theory that a parasite-modulated change in host attractiveness occurs, but not at the stage when transmission from the human host to mosquito vector can be effected
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APA

Public Library, A. & R., M (2024). Clinical Malaria Reduces Human Attractiveness to Mosquitoes. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/clinical-malaria-reduces-human-attractiveness-to-mosquitoes

MLA 8th

Public Library, Africana, and Mukabana R. "Clinical Malaria Reduces Human Attractiveness to Mosquitoes" Afribary. Afribary, 10 Mar. 2024, https://afribary.com/works/clinical-malaria-reduces-human-attractiveness-to-mosquitoes. Accessed 26 May. 2024.

MLA7

Public Library, Africana, and Mukabana R. . "Clinical Malaria Reduces Human Attractiveness to Mosquitoes". Afribary, Afribary, 10 Mar. 2024. Web. 26 May. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/clinical-malaria-reduces-human-attractiveness-to-mosquitoes >.

Chicago

Public Library, Africana and R., Mukabana . "Clinical Malaria Reduces Human Attractiveness to Mosquitoes" Afribary (2024). Accessed May 26, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/clinical-malaria-reduces-human-attractiveness-to-mosquitoes