Survival rate, blood feeding habits and sibling species composition of Aedes simpsoni complex: Implications for arbovirus transmission risk in East Africa

Abstract:

Aedes simpsoni complex has a wide distribution in Africa and comprises at least three described sub-species including the yellow fever virus (YFV) vector Ae. bromeliae. To date, the distribution and relative contributions of the sub-species and/or subpopulations including bionomic characteristics in relation to YF transmission dynamics remain poorly studied. In this study conducted in two areas with divergent ecosystems: peri-urban (coastal Rabai) and rural (Rift Valley Kerio Valley) in Kenya, survival rate was estimated by parity in Ae. simpsoni s.l. mosquitoes sampled using CO2-baited BG Sentinel traps. We then applied PCR targeting the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), region followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analytics to identify the sibling species in the Ae. simpsoni complex among parous and blood fed cohorts. Our results show that Ae. bromeliae was the most dominant sub-species in both areas, exhibiting high survival rates, human blood-feeding, and potentially, high vectorial capacity for pathogen transmission. We document for the first time the presence of Ae. lilii in Kenya and potentially yet-to-be described species in the complex displaying human feeding tendencies. We also infer a wide host feeding range on rodents, reptile, and domestic livestock besides humans especially for Ae. bromeliae. This feeding trend could likely expose humans to various zoonotic pathogens. Taken together, we highlight the utility of genotype-based analyses to generate precision surveillance data of vector populations for enhanced disease risk prediction and to guide cost-effective interventions (e.g. YF vaccinations).
Subscribe to access this work and thousands more
Overall Rating

0

5 Star
(0)
4 Star
(0)
3 Star
(0)
2 Star
(0)
1 Star
(0)
APA

Kamau, W (2024). Survival rate, blood feeding habits and sibling species composition of Aedes simpsoni complex: Implications for arbovirus transmission risk in East Africa. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/survival-rate-blood-feeding-habits-and-sibling-species-composition-of-aedes-simpsoni-complex-implications-for-arbovirus-transmission-risk-in-east-africa

MLA 8th

Kamau, Winnie "Survival rate, blood feeding habits and sibling species composition of Aedes simpsoni complex: Implications for arbovirus transmission risk in East Africa" Afribary. Afribary, 10 Mar. 2024, https://afribary.com/works/survival-rate-blood-feeding-habits-and-sibling-species-composition-of-aedes-simpsoni-complex-implications-for-arbovirus-transmission-risk-in-east-africa. Accessed 30 May. 2024.

MLA7

Kamau, Winnie . "Survival rate, blood feeding habits and sibling species composition of Aedes simpsoni complex: Implications for arbovirus transmission risk in East Africa". Afribary, Afribary, 10 Mar. 2024. Web. 30 May. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/survival-rate-blood-feeding-habits-and-sibling-species-composition-of-aedes-simpsoni-complex-implications-for-arbovirus-transmission-risk-in-east-africa >.

Chicago

Kamau, Winnie . "Survival rate, blood feeding habits and sibling species composition of Aedes simpsoni complex: Implications for arbovirus transmission risk in East Africa" Afribary (2024). Accessed May 30, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/survival-rate-blood-feeding-habits-and-sibling-species-composition-of-aedes-simpsoni-complex-implications-for-arbovirus-transmission-risk-in-east-africa