International Dynamics of Internal Conflict: The Role of Slavery in the Liberian Conflict (1820 to 2003)

Abstract:

Almost every internal war has an external component. Some external effects are purposive, where external actors aid and abet internal factions and governments. There are cases, however, of purposive international action that have prevented, mitigated, resolved, or managed internal conflicts. International response to conflict has always presented new dynamics to an existing conflict. The role of a variety of international actors, including individuals, states, international organizations, regional organizations, and Non-Governmental Organizations (NO0s) have been foci of major highlights in anecdotal analyses. Nevertheless, conflict management processes have not always been successful in achieving their ends. Old issues have normally been divorced from emerging ones in coming up with both theoretical and practical analyses that could be helpful in finding solutions for lasting peace in Africa. The Liberian experience provides a useful case study for examining conflict, peace settlement and reconstruction within the backdrop of historical and current issues. The conflict in Liberia attracted, in an unprecedented manner in Africa, global, regional and sub-regional intervention through the UN, OAU and ECOWAS respectively. Other local and international humanitarian organizations were also involved in the intervention. The peace management processes employed by these actors in the context served to address immediate problems and provide quick fix solutions. This research aimed at studying how historical context influences current dynamics of an on-going war and if any nexus can be drawn between both periods. More specifically, this thesis sought to explore the extent to which slavery may have played a role in the Liberian conflict witnessed in the 1990s and early 2000s. This was looked at within the broader international context while examining the root causes of the conflict, their effects, conflict management processes; and the interplay between issues, actors and interests. The researcher used secondary sources as the main source of data for the study. The study has relied on books, journals and reports from a wide range of individual authors, national and international organizations and institutions. The researcher hopes that at the end of this study, the findings will have answered a number of research questions and added knowledge on the significance of a critical examination of historical roots of a conflict in the analysis and resolution of conflict. The findings are therefore expected to strengthen conflict management processes in future.
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APA

Yvonne, R (2024). International Dynamics of Internal Conflict: The Role of Slavery in the Liberian Conflict (1820 to 2003). Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/international-dynamics-of-internal-conflict-the-role-of-slavery-in-the-liberian-conflict-1820-to-2003

MLA 8th

Yvonne, Rowa "International Dynamics of Internal Conflict: The Role of Slavery in the Liberian Conflict (1820 to 2003)" Afribary. Afribary, 04 May. 2024, https://afribary.com/works/international-dynamics-of-internal-conflict-the-role-of-slavery-in-the-liberian-conflict-1820-to-2003. Accessed 18 May. 2024.

MLA7

Yvonne, Rowa . "International Dynamics of Internal Conflict: The Role of Slavery in the Liberian Conflict (1820 to 2003)". Afribary, Afribary, 04 May. 2024. Web. 18 May. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/international-dynamics-of-internal-conflict-the-role-of-slavery-in-the-liberian-conflict-1820-to-2003 >.

Chicago

Yvonne, Rowa . "International Dynamics of Internal Conflict: The Role of Slavery in the Liberian Conflict (1820 to 2003)" Afribary (2024). Accessed May 18, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/international-dynamics-of-internal-conflict-the-role-of-slavery-in-the-liberian-conflict-1820-to-2003