Maize (Zea mays L.) Varietal Turnover Analysis Using DNA Finger Printing: The Case of Ethiopia

Abstract:

Realizing the growing importance of maize in the country’s crop production and food security, significant research efforts have been made to develop high yielding varieties and disseminate to smallholder farmers to enhance food security in the country. The study examined the varietal turnover using farmer self identification and Deoxyribonucleic Acid fingerprinting and determinants of maize cultivars turnover in Ethiopia. Secondary data from the household survey data collected by Central Statistical Agency and Deoxyribonucleic Acid fingerprinting identified for maize varieties were used in the analysis. To analyze the maize cultivars varietal turnover, a weighted average age Index (WA) was used. The Weighted Age for farmer self identification was compared with Deoxyribonucleic Acid fingerprinting in order to check whether the result from Deoxyribonucleic Acid fingerprinting approach is different. The multiple linear regression models were used in modeling determinants of maize cultivars varietal turnover. The findings of the study indicate that maize adoption estimates from the Deoxyribonucleic Acid fingerprinting technology is different from farmer perceptions. As noted, according to the household survey 43.75% of the farmers used improved maize varieties during the study main cropping season, whereas, based on Deoxyribonucleic Acid fingerprinting analysis 97.16% of the respondents used improved maize varieties. On the other hand, the Weighted Age was about 12 years, whereas, based on Deoxyribonucleic Acid fingerprinting analysis it was about 11 years in Ethiopia for the crop year 2015. Econometric results indicate that, Farmers’ experience in growing maize affects WA weakly and statistically significant and positive. This may imply that more experienced farmers are refusing to change their varieties as they are small holders and so risk averse. Family size being positively affecting varietal turnover also implies that if the decision to cultivate a new variety requires consensus among key family members who are involved in farming, then idea generation and making decision may become more difficult and taking time, causing households to forgo varietal turnover in order to avoid disagreement.
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APA

Guta, B (2024). Maize (Zea mays L.) Varietal Turnover Analysis Using DNA Finger Printing: The Case of Ethiopia. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/maize-zea-mays-l-varietal-turnover-analysis-using-dna-finger-printing-the-case-of-ethiopia

MLA 8th

Guta, Bukero "Maize (Zea mays L.) Varietal Turnover Analysis Using DNA Finger Printing: The Case of Ethiopia" Afribary. Afribary, 12 Apr. 2024, https://afribary.com/works/maize-zea-mays-l-varietal-turnover-analysis-using-dna-finger-printing-the-case-of-ethiopia. Accessed 21 May. 2024.

MLA7

Guta, Bukero . "Maize (Zea mays L.) Varietal Turnover Analysis Using DNA Finger Printing: The Case of Ethiopia". Afribary, Afribary, 12 Apr. 2024. Web. 21 May. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/maize-zea-mays-l-varietal-turnover-analysis-using-dna-finger-printing-the-case-of-ethiopia >.

Chicago

Guta, Bukero . "Maize (Zea mays L.) Varietal Turnover Analysis Using DNA Finger Printing: The Case of Ethiopia" Afribary (2024). Accessed May 21, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/maize-zea-mays-l-varietal-turnover-analysis-using-dna-finger-printing-the-case-of-ethiopia