Chickenpox in children

ABSTRACT

Chickenpox is a highly contagious viral illness caused by primary infection with the Varicella zoster virus (VZV). It is characterized by vesicular skin lesions and fever. It causes an itchy rash that looks like tiny blisters. The rash usually starts on the face, stomach, chest or back, and spreads to other parts of the body. A mild fever, tiredness, and slight body discomfort usually come with the rash. Anyone who hasn’t had chickenpox already can get it, but it is most common among children under 15 years old. At the blister stage, intense itching is usually present. Blisters may also occur on the palms, soles, and genital area. Commonly, visible evidence of the disease develops in the oral cavity & tonsil areas in the form of small ulcers which can be painful or itchy or both; this enanthem (internal rash) can precede the exanthem (external rash) by 1 to 3 days or can be concurrent. These symptoms of chickenpox appear 10 to 21 days after exposure to a contagious person. 

Chickenpox is very contagious and spreads easily from infected people. It can spread from either a cough or a sneeze. It can also spread by touching or breathing in the virus particles that come from the blisters on the skin. The virus that causes chickenpox lives in the nose and throat and is sprayed into the air when an infected person sneezes, coughs or talks. It is also in the blisters and rash and spreads by touching the rash. People with chickenpox can spread the disease from 1-2 days before symptoms start and until all the blisters are crusted over (usually about 5 days). However, people with weak immune systems are contagious longer, usually as long as new blisters keep appearing. Symptoms usually appear about 10-21 days after exposure to the virus.

Two doses of chickenpox vaccine are recommended to protect against the disease. It is necessary to protect your children by having them vaccinated when they are 12-15 months old and again at 4 to 6 years, particularly, if they have been in contact with someone with chickenpox. Older children and adults who did not have the vaccine or disease should also get two doses. Also, women who plan to have children and are not immune should also be vaccinated before they become pregnant.
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Title page        
Abstract           
Table of Contents          
1.0 INTRODUCTION         
2.0 THE HISTORY OF CHICKENPOX DISEASE      
3.0 CLINICAL SYMPTOMS         
 3.1 Symptoms of chickenpox       
4.0 PREVENTION          
5.0 MODE OF TRANSMISSION        
6.0 EPIDEMIOLOGY         
7.0 TREATMENT AND CONTROL        
8.0 REGION IT AFFECTS         
REFERENCE          



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APA

Ogungbemi, B. (2018). Chickenpox in children. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/chickenpox-in-children-3101

MLA 8th

Ogungbemi, Busayo "Chickenpox in children" Afribary. Afribary, 29 Jan. 2018, https://afribary.com/works/chickenpox-in-children-3101. Accessed 24 Jul. 2024.

MLA7

Ogungbemi, Busayo . "Chickenpox in children". Afribary, Afribary, 29 Jan. 2018. Web. 24 Jul. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/chickenpox-in-children-3101 >.

Chicago

Ogungbemi, Busayo . "Chickenpox in children" Afribary (2018). Accessed July 24, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/chickenpox-in-children-3101

Document Details
Field: Microbiology Type: Seminar 8 PAGES (3365 WORDS) (docx)