Knowledge, Attitude And Practices Regarding Sickle Cell Disease Among Adult Out Patients Inlira Regional Referral Hospital

ABSTRACT

Background: Sickle Cell Disease is one of the most common inherited genetic blood disorders

affecting humans world-wide. Sickle cell disease predominates in Africa including Uganda (WHO,

2011). Recent data in Uganda shows Northern Uganda is among the regions with the highest

prevalence of 19.2% (MoH Uganda, 2014).

Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study involving a total of 120 adult patients

attending general OPD in Lira Regional Hospital between the Months of February and March

2016. Accessible target group were consecutively enrolled as they come and only those who

consented were interviewed using a standardized, pretested questionnaires administered by trained

research assistants to collect data. Data was analyzed using SPSS,applying descriptive and

inferential techniques.

Results: Majority of the respondent knew about sickle cell disease, 272(78.5%) the sited source

of information included; Health units 141(40.5%),Talk show on radio or TV 83(24.1%),

290(83.5%) heard about sickle cell when they were above 18 years, while 57(16.5%) heard when

below 18 years, 332(95.7%) said sickle cell disease is acquired through parents who are carriers,

6(1.7%) through direct contact with sickle cell carrier and insect bites respectively, while 3(0.9%)

said through blood transfusion. 94(27.0%) described sickle cell disease as the disease that

specifically affects red blood cells, they described other signs and symptoms of the disease as;

joint pain, general body weakness, yellowing of the eyes, swelling at the joints, bone pain, coldness

and thinning or slimming of the body. 66.4% said sickle cell disease cannot be cured and 31.0%

said it can be cured, while 2.6% do not know. 317(91.4%) mentioned that sickle cell disease can

be treated medically, 24(6.9%) said the disease can be treated by Herbs, while 6(1.7%) said the

disease can be treated by both methods. 92.1% said their relatives got treatment from hospitals,

3.2% said from herbalists, while 4.8% from both, 102 (29.3%) had ever tested for sickle cell

disease, while 245(70.7%) never tested, 84.0% said they cannot marry a sickle cell carrier, while

16.0% said they can. 94.7% accepted to test for sickle cell before marriage, while 5.3% declined.

Conclusion: Majority(78.5%) of the respondents were aware and basically knowledgeable about

sickle cell disease, 94.7% had positive attitude about the disease however there is need for stake

holders to continue with sensitization and control programs.

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APA

CHARLES, A (2021). Knowledge, Attitude And Practices Regarding Sickle Cell Disease Among Adult Out Patients Inlira Regional Referral Hospital. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/knowledge-attitude-and-practices-regarding-sickle-cell-disease-among-adult-out-patients-inlira-regional-referral-hospital

MLA 8th

CHARLES, ALULE "Knowledge, Attitude And Practices Regarding Sickle Cell Disease Among Adult Out Patients Inlira Regional Referral Hospital" Afribary. Afribary, 03 Jun. 2021, https://afribary.com/works/knowledge-attitude-and-practices-regarding-sickle-cell-disease-among-adult-out-patients-inlira-regional-referral-hospital. Accessed 28 May. 2024.

MLA7

CHARLES, ALULE . "Knowledge, Attitude And Practices Regarding Sickle Cell Disease Among Adult Out Patients Inlira Regional Referral Hospital". Afribary, Afribary, 03 Jun. 2021. Web. 28 May. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/knowledge-attitude-and-practices-regarding-sickle-cell-disease-among-adult-out-patients-inlira-regional-referral-hospital >.

Chicago

CHARLES, ALULE . "Knowledge, Attitude And Practices Regarding Sickle Cell Disease Among Adult Out Patients Inlira Regional Referral Hospital" Afribary (2021). Accessed May 28, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/knowledge-attitude-and-practices-regarding-sickle-cell-disease-among-adult-out-patients-inlira-regional-referral-hospital