Phosphorus Adsorption Maxima Of Selected Ghanaian Soils And Their Relationship To Phosphorus Availability

INTRODUCTION An adequate knowledge of the chemical reactions which occur when fertilizer is placed in soils is a pre-requisite to the development of sound fertilizer practices. Without such a knowledge, there is the possibility of applying either too much or too little fertilizer than is necessary with its consequent crop failure. Phosphorus is one of the major nutrient elements required by plants for growth. The role of phosphorus in plant nutrition includes its effect on cell division, flowering, fruiting and seed formation, crop maturation, root development, especially of lateral and fibrous rootlets, strength of straw in cereals, and crop quality of vegetables. The problem of phosphorus deficiency in Ghanaian soils and its attendant low crop -yields has long been recognized by many research workers. Between 5,0 ppm and 14.5 ppm phosphorus has been found in the topsoil CO" " 6 ") of many forest profiles in Ghana (Hardy and Amoroso-Centeno 1938; DeEndredy and Montgomery 1954; Nye 1952). Using Bray's rapid extraction procedure with 0,TN. HC1 and 0.03N NH^F Nye (1952) obtained 4 ppm phosphorus in the topsoil (0" - 6 ") of sixty-three soils from savanna sites in Ghana, In spite of these very low value o-f available phosphorus in Ghanaian soils, Nye (1952) reports that response to phosphorus application has not been always conclusive. This lack of response has often been attributed to the high fixation capacity of tropical soils, especially the strong acid ones with high content of iron and aluminium rendering small dressings of phosphate ineffective. Several observations made by agronomists the worldover on crop response to applied phosphate give credence to those made in Ghana, These indicate that fertilizer phosphate after it has been applied is not recovered wholly in the crop that is immediately planted. Hemwall (1957) in a review, reports that crops recover only 10 to 301 of applied phosphorus, Sauchelli (1965) also reports that plants on phosphorus-fertilized soils generally recover just 20 to 30% of the added phosphate. The general consensus among soil chemists is that chemical precipitation and colloidal adsorption are chiefly responsible, for the loss. As indicated earlier on, most Ghanaian soils are deficient in phosphorus and yet would not give any response to applied phosphorus fertilizer. Investigation by many research workers have also proved the methods of assessing the availability of phosphorus quite inadequate. We therefore propose to tackle the problem of phosphorus availability studies from another angle, ix In our view before any: economic yield can be realized from any phosphorus fertilizer application it is necessary to understand the phenomenon of phosphorus adsorption in soils and how the phosphorus is made available to plants. The purpose of the present study, therefore, is to investigate the phosphorus adsorption phenomenon in some selected Ghanaian soils with a view to greater understanding of the ways of avoiding problems associated with phosphate fertilizer application to these soils and also with a view to maximizing the efficient use of such fertilizer applications. The research programme was- designed to:- (i) determine the phosphorus adsorption maxima of .selected Ghanaian soils using the Langmuir isotherm as modified by Olsen and Watanable (1957), (ii) relate these maxima to phosphorus availability, Ciii) relate the adsorption maxima to some soil properties and, (iv) estimate the rates of P application necessary to obtain optimum yield on the soil series used..

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APA

Cobbina, J (2021). Phosphorus Adsorption Maxima Of Selected Ghanaian Soils And Their Relationship To Phosphorus Availability. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/phosphorus-adsorption-maxima-of-selected-ghanaian-soils-and-their-relationship-to-phosphorus-availability

MLA 8th

Cobbina, Joseph "Phosphorus Adsorption Maxima Of Selected Ghanaian Soils And Their Relationship To Phosphorus Availability" Afribary. Afribary, 06 Apr. 2021, https://afribary.com/works/phosphorus-adsorption-maxima-of-selected-ghanaian-soils-and-their-relationship-to-phosphorus-availability. Accessed 13 Jul. 2024.

MLA7

Cobbina, Joseph . "Phosphorus Adsorption Maxima Of Selected Ghanaian Soils And Their Relationship To Phosphorus Availability". Afribary, Afribary, 06 Apr. 2021. Web. 13 Jul. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/phosphorus-adsorption-maxima-of-selected-ghanaian-soils-and-their-relationship-to-phosphorus-availability >.

Chicago

Cobbina, Joseph . "Phosphorus Adsorption Maxima Of Selected Ghanaian Soils And Their Relationship To Phosphorus Availability" Afribary (2021). Accessed July 13, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/phosphorus-adsorption-maxima-of-selected-ghanaian-soils-and-their-relationship-to-phosphorus-availability