Soil Transmitted Helminth and Malaria Co-infection Among Primary School Children in Egbema, Rivers State, Nigeria

The MasterMind Project Chinedu Glory Osinachi 130 PAGES (20043 WORDS) Thesis
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ABSTRACT

Intestinal parasite co-infections are major public health problems of children in developing countries causing under nutrition, anaemia obstruction, mental and physical growth retardation. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of soil transmitted helminth (STHs) and malaria co-infection among primary school children in Ogba/Egbema/Ndoni Local Government Area, Rivers state Nigeria. A total of 464 stools were sampled randomly from three Egbema community primary school children from January-April 2015. The samples were from children of both sexes whose ages ranged from 4-15 years old. Blood film determination, direct wet mount and concentration technique were respectively used for diagnosis of malaria and STHs infection. A pre-tested questionnaire was administered to each of the children to elicit information on risk factors for malaria and STHs infection. 181(38.7%) of the samples were positive to various STHs with A. Lumbricoides (29.7%), hookworm specie (12.92%), T. Trichiura (4.5%), E. vermicularis (1.28%) and S. Stercoralis (1.9%). There were also cases of mixed infection of STHs (45.83%). Males recorded a slightly higher prevalence rate (38.91%) than female (38.7%) which showed no significant difference (p>0.05) on both sexes. The infection was detected in all age group examined, with the 8-11 years age group recording the highest (44.6%). The overall prevalence rate for malaria was (29.1%), with male (30.4%) higher than the female (28.3%). The prevalence of anaemia among school children (11%) showed no significant difference (p>0.05) between the level of anaemia and the type of school the children attended. Children whose mothers are traders were the most infected 132(56.7%) while children whose mothers are house wife had least infection and Children who do not wash their hands after toilet 233(96.5%) had high in8fection of STHs. Malaria was low among children who used insecticide (p=0.021) than those who do not use insecticide. Furthermore co-infection (38.7%) was indication of high parasitic burden and increased problems associated with anaemia which aggravates the burden of disease in Nigerian children. Based on these findings, there is need to implement effective malaria and intestinal parasite control measures in this community.

Keywords: Soil, Helminths, Malaria, Co-Infection, Anaemia, Risk factor, Public health. 

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APA

The MasterMind, P (2021). Soil Transmitted Helminth and Malaria Co-infection Among Primary School Children in Egbema, Rivers State, Nigeria. Afribary.com: Retrieved March 06, 2021, from https://afribary.com/works/soil-transmitted-helminth-and-malaria-co-infection-among-primary-school-children-in-egbema-rivers-state-nigeria

MLA 8th

Project, The MasterMind. "Soil Transmitted Helminth and Malaria Co-infection Among Primary School Children in Egbema, Rivers State, Nigeria" Afribary.com. Afribary.com, 23 Feb. 2021, https://afribary.com/works/soil-transmitted-helminth-and-malaria-co-infection-among-primary-school-children-in-egbema-rivers-state-nigeria . Accessed 06 Mar. 2021.

MLA7

Project, The MasterMind. "Soil Transmitted Helminth and Malaria Co-infection Among Primary School Children in Egbema, Rivers State, Nigeria". Afribary.com, Afribary.com, 23 Feb. 2021. Web. 06 Mar. 2021. < https://afribary.com/works/soil-transmitted-helminth-and-malaria-co-infection-among-primary-school-children-in-egbema-rivers-state-nigeria >.

Chicago

Project, The MasterMind. "Soil Transmitted Helminth and Malaria Co-infection Among Primary School Children in Egbema, Rivers State, Nigeria" Afribary.com (2021). Accessed March 06, 2021. https://afribary.com/works/soil-transmitted-helminth-and-malaria-co-infection-among-primary-school-children-in-egbema-rivers-state-nigeria