THE BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PARASITOLOGICAL QUALITY OF DRINKING WATER AND PEOPLE’S WATER HANDLING PRACTICES IN AND AROUND ADAMA TOWN, OROMIA REGION, EASTERN ETHIOPIA

Abstract:

Reduction of water-borne diseases and development of safe water resources is a major public health goal in developing countries.. Thus, the major purpose of this study was to assess the microbiological and parasitological quality of drinking water sources and the people’s water handling practices in and around Adama Town, eastern Ethiopia. More specifically, the study gave emphasis to assess the bacteriological quality of drinking- water using indicator bacteria; the parasitological quality of drinking water and to assess people’s water- handling practices and knowledge about water-borne diseases in the study area. A total of 447 water samples were collected from drinking- water sources in three rounds (432 from tap water, nine from well water, and six from river water sources) and tested addition, data regarding people’s water handling practices and knowledge about water-borne diseases were collected through questionnaire and observation check-list from households. All the collected data were processed using and compared against standards set by WHO and the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, Ministry of Water Resources. The results indicated that Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria (AMB), Total Coliforms (TC), Faecal Coliforms (FC), Faecal Streptococci (FS), Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia lamblia cyst were detected in almost all the samples of the different water sources. AMB were detected 100% in well and river, 88.89% of tap water samples. The mean AMB counts (±SE) for tap water, well water and river water samples were 5.94X102 ±33.6, 1.70X106 ±1.89X105 , 2.17X106 ±2.56X105 , respectively. TC bacteria were detected in 43.35% tap water samples and 100% of Well and River water samples. When the occurrence of TC was compared with standards, only 56.25, 27.55, 10.88, and 5.32% of the tap water samples were safe, of reasonable quality, polluted, and dangerous, respectively. The mean TC counts (±SE) were 24.58±2.9, 84.33±13.47, and 122.17±24.92 for tap, well and river water samples, respectively. FCs were also found in 39.35% of tap water samples and in all (100%) well and river water samples. However, out of samples tested from tap water sources, only 60.65% and 31.25% were safe and with reasonable quality, respectively. Mean counts of FCs (±SE) were 17.94±2.95, 37.33±7.83 and 51.33±13.41 for tap, well and river water samples, respectively. FS were detected in 4.17 and 100% of tap water and well & river water samples, respectively. With respect to the occurrence of FS, when compared with the standards, 95.83 and 4.17% of the tap water samples were safe and with reasonable quality, respectively. The mean counts of FS(±SE) were 3.5±0.27, 12.44±2.61, and 46.17±12.16 for tap, well and river water samples, respectively. Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 23.61, 44.44, and 66.67% ,while Giardia lamblia was detected in 8.1, 33.33, and 50% of the tap water, well water and river water samples, respectively. Regarding water handling practices, Jerry can (81.76%) was the most commonly preferred type of water collection container in the study area. The findings also confirmed that only 13.36% of the households always cleaned the materials used for collecting drinking water. Moreover, more than half of the households (53.62%) were not covering drinking water collection containers during collection and transportation. The majority of the households (80.13%) were also storing drinking water for more than two days. The results of this study further showed a large number of the households (75.57%) were not using any form of treatment on the drinkingwater they use. The study also showed that majority of the households (89.58%) had never been given the chance to participate in any training and awareness creation programs so far. As a result, their understanding about quality of drinking water and water-borne diseases was largely unsatisfactory. Finally, based on the findings of the study, making continuous follow- up on drinking water sources, developing appropriate control measures, conducting awareness creation activities, integrating sector office activities, arranging annual forum, and conducting further research are recommended
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APA

Meseret, D (2024). THE BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PARASITOLOGICAL QUALITY OF DRINKING WATER AND PEOPLE’S WATER HANDLING PRACTICES IN AND AROUND ADAMA TOWN, OROMIA REGION, EASTERN ETHIOPIA. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/the-bacteriological-and-parasitological-quality-of-drinking-water-and-people-s-water-handling-practices-in-and-around-adama-town-oromia-region-eastern-ethiopia

MLA 8th

Meseret, Demisse "THE BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PARASITOLOGICAL QUALITY OF DRINKING WATER AND PEOPLE’S WATER HANDLING PRACTICES IN AND AROUND ADAMA TOWN, OROMIA REGION, EASTERN ETHIOPIA" Afribary. Afribary, 12 Apr. 2024, https://afribary.com/works/the-bacteriological-and-parasitological-quality-of-drinking-water-and-people-s-water-handling-practices-in-and-around-adama-town-oromia-region-eastern-ethiopia. Accessed 26 May. 2024.

MLA7

Meseret, Demisse . "THE BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PARASITOLOGICAL QUALITY OF DRINKING WATER AND PEOPLE’S WATER HANDLING PRACTICES IN AND AROUND ADAMA TOWN, OROMIA REGION, EASTERN ETHIOPIA". Afribary, Afribary, 12 Apr. 2024. Web. 26 May. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/the-bacteriological-and-parasitological-quality-of-drinking-water-and-people-s-water-handling-practices-in-and-around-adama-town-oromia-region-eastern-ethiopia >.

Chicago

Meseret, Demisse . "THE BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PARASITOLOGICAL QUALITY OF DRINKING WATER AND PEOPLE’S WATER HANDLING PRACTICES IN AND AROUND ADAMA TOWN, OROMIA REGION, EASTERN ETHIOPIA" Afribary (2024). Accessed May 26, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/the-bacteriological-and-parasitological-quality-of-drinking-water-and-people-s-water-handling-practices-in-and-around-adama-town-oromia-region-eastern-ethiopia