Fatty Acids, Diet And Body Indices of Type II Diabetic Caucasians, African Americans And Ghanaians

Subscribe to access this work and thousands more

ABSTRACT

Diet, serum lipid profile, metabolic and body indices of Type II diabetics compared to non-diabetic subjects among Caucasian-Americans, African-Americans and Ghanaians were studied in this project work. Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic Caucasians, African Americans and Ghanaians were recruited. Data collected include food intake and anthropometric measurement. Blood samples were also taken for glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and serum lipid analysis. Serum very low-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, high-density lipoproteins, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were determined. The mean energy intake among Ghanaian non-diabetic controls was 2320 kcal/d, of this 57% of the total energy intake was contributed by carbohydrate. Among the diabetic groups, Caucasians had the highest energy intake of 2383 kcal/d, with carbohydrate contributing 38% of the total energy intake. Ghanaian diabetics recorded the lowest body mass index (BMI: 26.4 ± 6.1 kg/m2), percent body fat (20.0 ±8.7%), and waist to thigh ratio (1.6 ±_0.2) compared to the Caucasians and African American diabetic groups. Low fat intake and high percent body fat levels were observed among the African American diabetics (65g/d and 32.2%) whilst the inverse was observed among the Caucasian diabetics (120g/d and 25.9%). Caucasian controls (CC) and African American controls (AC) had higher polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels but lower saturated fatty acid (SFA) levels (CC- 42% PUFA vs 26% SFA; AC- 48% PUFA vs 27% SFA). Ghanaian controls had high SFA and low levels of PUFA (33% and 31% respectively), similar to their diabetic counterparts (34% and 17%). Caucasian diabetics had high PUFA and low SFA (34% and 25%), and African American diabetics had low PUFA and high SFA (29% and 32%). NEFA ranged between 0.6 and 1.1mEqg/L. Total cholesterol, triglycerides and the lipoproteins were within normal range for both diabetics and normal subjects. The data suggest a rapid turnover in carbohydrate metabolism for the energy needs among Ghanaians and that fat metabolism may differ between Caucasians and African Americans. Also, the data indicate low risk to cardiovascular diseases among the subjects studied. 

Subscribe to access this work and thousands more
Overall Rating

0

5 Star
(0)
4 Star
(0)
3 Star
(0)
2 Star
(0)
1 Star
(0)
APA

BANINI, A (2021). Fatty Acids, Diet And Body Indices of Type II Diabetic Caucasians, African Americans And Ghanaians. Afribary. Retrieved from https://afribary.com/works/fatty-acids-diet-and-body-indices-of-type-ii-diabetic-caucasians-african-americans-and-ghanaians

MLA 8th

BANINI, AKPENE "Fatty Acids, Diet And Body Indices of Type II Diabetic Caucasians, African Americans And Ghanaians" Afribary. Afribary, 07 Apr. 2021, https://afribary.com/works/fatty-acids-diet-and-body-indices-of-type-ii-diabetic-caucasians-african-americans-and-ghanaians. Accessed 26 Feb. 2024.

MLA7

BANINI, AKPENE . "Fatty Acids, Diet And Body Indices of Type II Diabetic Caucasians, African Americans And Ghanaians". Afribary, Afribary, 07 Apr. 2021. Web. 26 Feb. 2024. < https://afribary.com/works/fatty-acids-diet-and-body-indices-of-type-ii-diabetic-caucasians-african-americans-and-ghanaians >.

Chicago

BANINI, AKPENE . "Fatty Acids, Diet And Body Indices of Type II Diabetic Caucasians, African Americans And Ghanaians" Afribary (2021). Accessed February 26, 2024. https://afribary.com/works/fatty-acids-diet-and-body-indices-of-type-ii-diabetic-caucasians-african-americans-and-ghanaians